Updates

Stopping BP's toxic dumping scheme.

In 2007, BP announced plans to increase its dumping of toxic chemicals into Lake Michigan by hundreds of pounds a day. But through our advocacy and organizing, we gathered 80,000 petition signatures and forced BP to back down under what the Chicago Tribune called "firestorm" of criticism. Environment Illinois has since helped win numerous victories for Lake Michigan, including cleaning up mercury and other industrial toxins.

News Release | Environment America

Report: Utilities vastly undervalue solar energy

CHICAGO, IL – Households and businesses with solar panels deliver greater benefits than they receive through programs like net metering, a report said today, countering increasing complaints from utilities that solar homeowners don’t pay their fair share.

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News Release | Environment Illinois

Obama administration issues rule to help protect Lake Michigan and Illinois’ rivers

Chicago, IL – Fifty-six percent of Illinois’ streams, including those feeding Lake Michigan, will regain federal protections under a final rule signed today by top Obama administration officials. The Clean Water Rule restores Clean Water Act safeguards to streams and wetlands that have been vulnerable to development and pollution for nearly ten years.

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Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Shelter from the Storm

Wetlands are more than just scenic parts of America’s natural landscape. They are also home to wildlife and perform many vital functions that protect the health of our waterways and communities. Of crucial importance for our towns and cities, wetlands also offer flood protection by absorbing large amounts of water that may fall during a storm before releasing it slowly into the environment. 

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Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

10 Ways to Help Your City Go Solar

Last month's Shining Cities report detailed how cities are good for solar and solar is good for cities. We've seen some impressive strides across the nation to momentously expand our solar capabilities. But we're not where we need to be yet. To obtain a clean energy future your cities and towns need to do even more. Here's how to push them in the right direction! 

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Report | Environment Illinois Research and Policy Center

How do Millennials experience climate change?

As a result of global warming, young Americans today are growing up in a different climate than their parents and grandparents experienced. It is warmer than it used to be. Storms pack more of a punch. Rising seas increasingly flood low-lying land. Large wildfires have grown bigger, more frequent and more expensive to control. People are noticing changes in their own backyards, no matter where they live.

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