Solar power is a growing American success story

Hundreds of thousands of Americans have gone solar and millions more are ready to join their ranks so all of us can power our lives and our communities with clean, renewable, local energy. The barriers to solar are falling faster than ever, too, with more and more cities, states and companies adopting innovative pro-solar policies that have made solar cheaper and easier to install.

That’s why we have 10 times more solar power in the U.S. today than we did in 2010, enough to power more than 5 million homes, with another home going solar every two minutes, as of the end of 2015.

What are we up against? 

Yet just as solar is about to reach a tipping point, some utilities and other special interests want to throw new obstacles in the way. Our Solar for All campaign is working to knock those barriers out of the way so more Americans can go solar.

We’re working with our national network to urge mayors, governors and others to set ambitious solar goals and commitments, offer new solar incentives, and promote new community solar programs. And we’re mobilizing people to counter the utilities and other special interests who want to make solar more expensive and harder to install.

We’re fighting attacks

And we’re winning. In just the past year, we’ve turned back attacks on solar in Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico and won new commitments to solar in Austin and Houston, Athens and Atlanta, and New York State and California, among other places. Over the last 10 years, we’ve helped establish dozens of pro-solar programs, including the biggest: California’s Million Solar Roofs Initiative.

What can you do? 

We want you to join us by showing your support for solar. You can send an email to your local officials, write a letter to your local newspaper, attend one of our solar forums, or join us at a news conference or other special event.

Whatever you can do, the time for action is now. Solar is at a tipping point. If we keep winning more pro-solar policies, we’ll see millions more Americans go solar in the next decade, putting us on a path to a 100% renewable future. If we let utilities and other special interests get in the way, that future will remain out of reach as solar sputters and stalls.

Together, we can achieve Solar for All

We can do this. Together, we can bring more solar power to our homes, our communities, our churches and schools, our workplaces and our lives—and leave a cleaner, healthier world for kids growing up today and future generations.

Solar For All Updates

News Release | Environment Illinois

Carbondale Votes Unanimously to Support Statewide Fracking Moratorium

Carbondale, IL—In a unanimous decision, the Carbondale City Council passed a resolution calling on the Illinois General Assembly to “enact a moratorium on high volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing until such time as the health and environmental concerns of the people of Illinois are addressed”. In this decision, Carbondale joins the Illinois towns of Carlyle, Anna and Alto Pass and Union and Jackson Counties in taking action supporting a moratorium, becoming the largest city yet to do so.

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Headline

FedEx: We need to get off oil

FedEx, citing the economic and national security harms posed by oil dependence, and the inability to meet our energy needs by drilling alone, announces plan to get off oil. 

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News Release | Environment Illinois Research & Education Center

24 out of 25 Illinoisans Live in Areas Hit by Recent Weather Disasters, New Report Finds—Global Warming to Bring More Extreme Weather

After a year that saw many parts of the country hit by scorching heat, devastating wildfires, severe storms and record flooding, a new report finds that the vast majority of Illinoisans live in counties recently affected by weather disasters. Given that global warming could lead to certain extreme weather events becoming even more common or more severe in the future, U.S. Senator Dick Durbin, Environment Illinois, and experts today called for U.S. EPA to finalize pending rules to cut the largest sources of dangerous carbon pollution.

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Report | Environment Illinois Research & Education Center

In the Path of the Storm

Weather disasters kill or injure hundreds of Americans each year and cause billions of dollars in economic damage. The risks posed by some types of weather-related disasters will likely increase in a warming world. Scientists have already detected increases in extreme precipitation events and heat waves in the United States, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recently concluded that global warming will likely lead to further changes in weather extremes.

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News Release | Environment Illinois Research & Education Center

Obama Administration to Protect Americans’ Health by Setting Carbon Pollution Standards for New Power Plants

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today proposed historic new limits on carbon pollution from new power plants. Coal-fired power plants are the largest single source of carbon pollution in the U.S., yet there are currently no federal limits on this pollution from power plants. The proposed Carbon Pollution Standard will correct that for new power plants by limiting emissions to more than 1,000 pounds of carbon dioxide pollution for each megawatt of electricity produced.

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